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BDG defines the future of the office

Workplace specialists BDG architecture + design (www.bdg-a-d.com/) continues to define the

future of the office with a reconfiguration of its award-winning space at the iconic Sea

Containers building on London’s South Bank that takes a ‘People-First, Future-Focused’

approach.

When BDG completed the Sea Containers project in 2017, it became a blueprint for the transformation and repurposing of old buildings, clearly demonstrating how the built environment can have a positive impact on the integration of people, place and purpose.  The project went on to win several awards, notably the British Council for Office (BCO) Award for Innovation.

To tackle the return to the office BDG gathered data from 150 online interactive workshops, completed over the last 18 months with over 3,000 participants.  Using cutting-edge technology, open plan audio visual solutions, sensor technology and voice activation to help improve user experience and understanding of ‘space as a tool’ allowed for the continual development and re-calibration as the space learns and adapts to user insight.  In addition, mobility and adaptability were other core themes of the workplace reconfiguration to maintain users physical health, coupled with green space to provide better comfort and stimulation for mental health.

Commenting on the transformation, Chief Creative Officer Colin Macgadie says “We’ve long been advocates for intelligent assessment of demand when working with our clients to define their workspace.  What we’re seeing is that ‘quantity’ and ‘quality’ have become equals at the early stages of definition as organizations make a tangible shift to ‘people-first’ decision making.  Our extensive engagement with end users and occupiers globally has provided a huge amount of insight into the expectation that surrounds the workspace of the future and the emphasis on performance and comfort.”

When BDG completed the Sea Containers project in 2017, it became a blueprint for the transformation and repurposing of old buildings, clearly demonstrating how the built environment can have a positive impact on the integration of people, place and purpose.  The project went on to win several awards, notably the British Council for Office (BCO) Award for Innovation.